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Honey Brown Hope Foundation Rakes in National, State and Local Recognition

Honey Brown Hope Foundation Rakes in National, State and Local Recognition

Honey Brown Hope Foundation

Houston, TX — The Honey Brown Hope Foundation, a nationally recognized, award-winning 501(c)3 non-profit that has served youth and their families for over two decades, announced today that it is thankful this holiday season for recently being recognized for its civil rights

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Community Empowerment: Black Chambers of Commerce Where Is My Patronage?

Community Empowerment: Black Chambers of Commerce Where Is My Patronage?

Peter Grear

Educate, organize and mobilize -- Back in September I wrote an article entitled, Voter Suppression: Creating Black Wealth.  The impetus for that article was a commentary written by Earl G. Graves, Sr., Publisher of Black Enterprise. 

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Employees of Small, Locally-Owned Businesses Have More Company Loyalty

Employees of Small, Locally-Owned Businesses Have More Company Loyalty

loyalty to employers

Employees who work at small, locally owned businesses have the highest level of loyalty to their employers — and for rural workers, size and ownership of their company figure even more into their commitment than job satisfaction does

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The Pawns of Politics: Where Is My Patronage?

The Pawns of Politics: Where Is My Patronage?

Peter Grear

Educate, organize and mobilize -- For more than a year leading up to the recently completed General Elections, I’ve written about Voter Suppression, gerrymandering, the Black vote and voters.  

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Verbal Abuse in the Workplace: Are Men or Women Most at Risk?

Verbal Abuse in the Workplace: Are Men or Women Most at Risk?

Abuse in the Workplace

There is no significant difference in the prevalence of verbal abuse in the workplace between men and women, according to a systematic review of the literature conducted by researchers at the Institut universitaire de santé mentale de Montréal

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The Decision to Handle Rejection

The Decision to Handle Rejection

Rev. Manson B. Johnson

The Big Idea: Endurance is the key to achieving challenging goals in life.“Man’s rejection can be God’s direction.  God sometimes uses the rejection of hateful people to move us to a new place or assignment–where we wouldn’t have thought of going on our own.  

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Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Print Subscription

 Greater Diversity News (GDN) is a statewide publication with national reach and relevance.  We are a chosen news source for underrepresented and underserved communities in North Carolina.  

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Students Helping Students: a Guide for Developing Social Skills in Students with Disabilities

Written by Vanderbilt University on 17 February 2009.

Students Helping Students: a Guide for Developing Social Skills in Students with DisabilitiesStudents helping other students learn has been proven to boost academic achievement and social skills in students with and without disabilities. A new book by Vanderbilt University researchers, Peer Support Strategies for Improving All Students’ Social Lives and Learning, based on over 20 years of research in the field, offers teachers practical guidelines for implementing these strategies in the classroom.

“We have found that the best programs emphasize similarities, not differences, between students with disabilities and those without,” Craig Kennedy, professor of special education at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College of education and human development and a co-author of the new book, said. “For the kids with disabilities, their non-disabled peer is a role model, academically, behaviorally and socially. And for the peer helper, they learn to see these students as individuals and friends, not just as ‘that disabled kid.’”

The purpose of the new book is to translate research Kennedy and his co-authors, Erik W. Carter and Lisa S. Cushing, have undertaken over the last 20 years in classrooms across the country into a step-by-step guide that teachers can use to structure and implement peer support programs.

The book provides detailed guidelines for identifying students most likely to benefit from having or being a peer support; recruiting participants; developing plans that promote access to the general curriculum for students with disabilities; aligning peer support goals and programs with state and federal standards; providing training for students, teachers and staff; extending peer support outside of the classroom to social and extracurricular events; and evaluating the effectiveness of the programs within a school.

“A research project we published in 1994 was the first to use other students, rather than a paraprofessional, to work with students with disabilities in a general education classroom,” Kennedy said. “We found that this peer support greatly facilitated the students with disabilities inclusion in the classroom. The students with disabilities met more people, made more friends and also benefited from peer instruction on classroom material.

“We also saw academic improvements in some of the peers,” Kennedy continued. “A students maintained their performance, but students who were previously earning Bs, Cs, Ds, and Fs improved academically. Because they were helping other students, they also seemed more engaged and more willing to ask for help than when working on their own.”

The book “convey(s) a hopeful perspective and genuine excitement about our opportunities to improve the quality of life for students with disabilities," Michael F. Giangreco, professor in the Department of Education and Center on Disability and Community Inclusion at the University of Vermont, wrote in a review of the book.

It is "a tested road map for getting peer support in real schools," Marti Snell, professor at the Curry School of Education, University of Virginia, also wrote.

Kennedy said peer support programs function best in schools that have formal structures, training and administrative support in place to implement them, and when a paraprofessional is in the classroom with the teacher to assist both the students with disabilities and their peer supports.

Kennedy is chair of the Vanderbilt Peabody Department of Special Education and an investigator at the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development. Carter is an assistant professor of education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and conducted research for the book while a post-doctoral student at Vanderbilt. Cushing is an assistant professor of education at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

For more information about Peabody College, ranked the No. 2 education school in the nation by U.S. News & World Report in 2008, visit http://peabody.vanderbilt.edu.