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Voter Outreach

Voter Outreach

Concepts, strategies and objectives to move voters to action

Written by Peter Grear Educate, Organize and Mobilize: Each week over the past several months I’ve written about various aspects of voter suppression with the purpose of explaining its concepts,…

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Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles at Trask Coliseum. WILMINGTON, NC – Boldly proclaiming, “I’m a winner,” and promising “an exciting brand of basketball” newly-christened UNCW head men’s basketball coach Kevin Keatts said Tuesday that a new day in Seahawk basketball has arrived.

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Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7 in a temptation-resistance paradigm. Approximately half of the children were lied to by an experimenter, who said there was “a huge bowl of candy in the next room” but quickly confessed this was just a ruse to get the child to come play a game. 

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Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

The unconscious mind could catch a liar

“We set out to test whether the unconscious mind could catch a liar – even when the conscious mind failed,” says ten Brinke. Along with Berkeley-Haas Assistant Professor Dana R. Carney, lead author ten Brinke and Dayna Stimson (BS 2013, Psychology), hypothesized that these seemingly paradoxical findings may be accounted for by unconscious mental processes.

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Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

North Carolina Alliance of Black Elected Officials

Written by Peter Grear, Esq.  Since August 2013 I've continued to ask myself "what would an effective campaign to defeat voter suppression look like?” Well, on Friday, February 14, 2014, Valentine's Day, I got my answer from Richard Hooker, President of the…

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Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website

The FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website. No paper, no hasel, read on your laptop or mobile devices. 

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Rethinking Integration at the University

Written by Dalhousie University on 26 March 2009.

For some in the university community, it may not be the easiest book to read but Anthony Stewart’s You Must Be A Basketball Player will force its readers to think about a series of often-challenging topics from white privilege, to race and integration – topics that are ever-more pressing.

Dr. Stewart, an Associate Professor of English at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, has penned a pointed critique of the university system and the challenges evident in integration at post secondary institutions. He wants the book to make a productive contribution to the way people think about issues related to diversity hiring in universities and issues of diversity more broadly. “The students we teach will be in positions to hire other people at some point in their lives,” he says. “My hope is that those students will gain some practice in dealing with these issues constructively and see diversity hiring not just as noblesse oblige on their parts, but as the more general benefit and ethical practice that I know it to be.”

Dr. Stewart suggests that his book is the result of his thinking about and observing the way “the academy” continues to look, in spite of 20 years’ worth of equity polices. He also notes that seeing a black President of the United States invites us to rethink many of the ideas we've held about who holds positions of power, authority, and influence in society.

“My argument is that we as a profession and as a professional class within Canadian society should bring the same creativity, intelligence, and honest consideration to this important issue that we do with the other aspects of our careers,” he adds. “I am an optimistic person, and believe that the situation can improve and that everyone in the university, and in society more widely, will benefit from such improvements. But I'm not kidding myself into thinking that such change will be easy or without its opponents.”

Dr. Stewart is quick to point out that book is not an attempt to lay blame, but it is a challenge to the university system to “walk the walk” instead of merely continuing to “talk the talk”. “These are not problems that will fix themselves by our pretending they don't exist,” he says. “My hope is that my book will give people a vocabulary with which to think about these issues in ways that won't necessarily alleviate people’s discomfort about these issues, but so that people will be able to be more honest about what the university does to maintain its present composition, and how that might change.”