You are now being logged in using your Facebook credentials
Gene Interacts with Stress and Leads to Heart Disease in Some People

Gene Interacts with Stress and Leads to Heart Disease in Some People

Research Duke Medicine

  DURHAM, N.C. – A new genetic finding from Duke Medicine suggests that some people who are prone to hostility, anxiety and depression might also be hard-wired to gain weight when exposed to chronic stress.

Read More...
Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Print Subscription

 Greater Diversity News (GDN) is a statewide publication with national reach and relevance.  We are a chosen news source for underrepresented and underserved communities in North Carolina.  

Read More...
Voter Suppression:  One More Round The Ground Game - Getting Out the Vote

Voter Suppression: One More Round The Ground Game - Getting Out the Vote

By Peter Grear

Educate, organize and mobilize -- Around 30 days and counting, this election season is in the home stretch.  The highest profile race is for US Senate between Kay Hagan and Thom Tillis.  

Read More...
Voter Suppression: JUDGES MATTER Mobilize! Mobilize! Mobilize!

Voter Suppression: JUDGES MATTER Mobilize! Mobilize! Mobilize!

by Peter Grear

As we draw nearer to D-day, November 4, 2014, the political parties, candidates and pressure groups are identifying their issues, slates and strategies to win.  My title to this week’s commentary makes a gross understatement, judges matter. 

Read More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2011 JoomlaWorks Ltd.

Senior Class Gift Eases Debt Burden for Freshmen

Written by Wake Forest University on 16 May 2010.

Higher Education Research Institute, more first-year college students have concerns about their ability to pay for collegeAccording to the Higher Education Research Institute, more first-year college students have concerns about their ability to pay for college than at any time in the last 40 years, and these concerns reflect the impact of the recession on entering college students. At Wake Forest University, graduating seniors are responding to this anxiety.

Having suffered through the worst years of the economic downturn, the class of 2010 was inspired to raise money to ease financial burdens for freshmen through a new initiative dubbed the Senior Class Scholars Program. Senior class members raised $12,500, to help pay down educational debt for five freshman—providing $2,500 for each.

“Many seniors said they felt called to give back because of scholarships they had received and because they know first-hand the difference that easing the burden of educational debt can make for a student,” says Lauren Hubbard, a 2009 Wake Forest graduate who helped initiate the program through her work in the university advancement office.

This year’s graduating class understands better than most how financial burdens can affect families and individuals. Many have had a parent lose a job and experienced the emotional and financial stress this causes for the family.

“It’s challenging enough to keep grades up without worrying about financial concerns,” says senior Melissa Beckett, a senior communications major from Dallas, Texas. “We wanted to give a gift to Wake Forest that would help other students just like us.”

GDN Link Exchange