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Voter Outreach

Voter Outreach

Concepts, strategies and objectives to move voters to action

Written by Peter Grear Educate, Organize and Mobilize: Each week over the past several months I’ve written about various aspects of voter suppression with the purpose of explaining its concepts,…

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Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles at Trask Coliseum. WILMINGTON, NC – Boldly proclaiming, “I’m a winner,” and promising “an exciting brand of basketball” newly-christened UNCW head men’s basketball coach Kevin Keatts said Tuesday that a new day in Seahawk basketball has arrived.

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Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7 in a temptation-resistance paradigm. Approximately half of the children were lied to by an experimenter, who said there was “a huge bowl of candy in the next room” but quickly confessed this was just a ruse to get the child to come play a game. 

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Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

The unconscious mind could catch a liar

“We set out to test whether the unconscious mind could catch a liar – even when the conscious mind failed,” says ten Brinke. Along with Berkeley-Haas Assistant Professor Dana R. Carney, lead author ten Brinke and Dayna Stimson (BS 2013, Psychology), hypothesized that these seemingly paradoxical findings may be accounted for by unconscious mental processes.

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Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

North Carolina Alliance of Black Elected Officials

Written by Peter Grear, Esq.  Since August 2013 I've continued to ask myself "what would an effective campaign to defeat voter suppression look like?” Well, on Friday, February 14, 2014, Valentine's Day, I got my answer from Richard Hooker, President of the…

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Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website

The FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website. No paper, no hasel, read on your laptop or mobile devices. 

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Beyond Black and White: Searching for the White Male Effect in the African-American Community

Written by Louie Rivers, Joseph Arvai and Paul Slovic on 30 January 2010.

white male effectA new study published this month concludes the tendency of some white males with higher education levels and conservative political and cultural views to have lower risk perceptions of environmental threats is not found among African-American males with similar backgrounds. The study also finds 69 percent of African-American men and women surveyed about their views on the environment and health risks are either “moderately” or “deeply” concerned about the natural environment.


“An initial examination of our survey results using the characteristics similar to those identified in previous studies of the White Male Effect (WME) — namely males who place a high degree of trust in experts and authority figures, who possess an above average level of education, and identify with a conservative political orientation — did not yield a group of African-Americans that perceived risks in a similar fashion to the men characterized by the WME,” the authors conclude.

The study, “Beyond a Simple Case of Black and White: Searching for the White Male Effect in the African-American Community,” was conducted by three experts, Louie Rivers and Joseph Arvai of Michigan State University, and Paul Slovic of Decision Research in Eugene, Oregon. The findings appear in the January 2010 issue of the journal Risk Analysis, published by the Society for Risk Analysis.

The authors used the survey results to examine the factors driving risk perception in the African-American community. They hypothesized African-American males with backgrounds and worldviews similar to their white counterparts also would share the latter group’s tendency to hold lower perceptions of environmental and health risks compared to the broader public. The WME is considered important because a number of policymakers and managers in society fit these demographic criteria and thus may have views on risks inconsistent with the public at large.

The results from another part of the study, which included both African-American men and women, “. . . challenge the anecdotal, yet increasingly pervasive, suggestion that African-Americans — especially those who live in urban and suburban areas (where our samples were drawn) — have become largely unconcerned about, and disassociated from, the natural environment,” according to the authors. The study was not based on a random sample but a sample of convenience. However, it drew from a regionally diverse population involving 403 respondents alerted through announcements in regions including Ohio, North Carolina, Maryland and Kentucky.

In terms of specific findings, the research concludes black men tend to have lower risk perceptions about environmental and health issues than black women, and that age, education, trust in authority, sense of control, and political orientation also are not correlated with their both men and women’s levels of risk perception.