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Voter Outreach

Voter Outreach

Concepts, strategies and objectives to move voters to action

Written by Peter Grear Educate, Organize and Mobilize: Each week over the past several months I’ve written about various aspects of voter suppression with the purpose of explaining its concepts,…

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Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles at Trask Coliseum. WILMINGTON, NC – Boldly proclaiming, “I’m a winner,” and promising “an exciting brand of basketball” newly-christened UNCW head men’s basketball coach Kevin Keatts said Tuesday that a new day in Seahawk basketball has arrived.

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Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7 in a temptation-resistance paradigm. Approximately half of the children were lied to by an experimenter, who said there was “a huge bowl of candy in the next room” but quickly confessed this was just a ruse to get the child to come play a game. 

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Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

The unconscious mind could catch a liar

“We set out to test whether the unconscious mind could catch a liar – even when the conscious mind failed,” says ten Brinke. Along with Berkeley-Haas Assistant Professor Dana R. Carney, lead author ten Brinke and Dayna Stimson (BS 2013, Psychology), hypothesized that these seemingly paradoxical findings may be accounted for by unconscious mental processes.

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Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

North Carolina Alliance of Black Elected Officials

Written by Peter Grear, Esq.  Since August 2013 I've continued to ask myself "what would an effective campaign to defeat voter suppression look like?” Well, on Friday, February 14, 2014, Valentine's Day, I got my answer from Richard Hooker, President of the…

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Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website

The FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website. No paper, no hasel, read on your laptop or mobile devices. 

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The Trouble with Women’s History Month

Written by Maureen Costello on 05 March 2010.

women in U.S. historyThe trouble with Women’s History Month - with all these special months - is that they encourage people to think that problems have been solved. The female heroes of yesterday are acknowledged, the debt paid and the slate wiped clean.

Women have been written back into history, we’re told.  And we get an entire month to learn about all the women in U.S. history, from Abigail Adams to Sojourner Truth to Sandra Day O’Connor and Hillary Rodham Clinton.

But history is more than biography. Highlighting a few noteworthy women in March (or Blacks in February or Latinos in October) can lead students to think that the exception proves the rule: These dozen or so ladies really stood out, but the rest?  Forgettable.

Were I still in the classroom, I would teach about how women lived, and why their contribut - whether as a crucial member of the household economy in the pre-industrial era, or as a Lowell mill girl, or as a secretary during the Mad Men years - were consistently undervalued.

And then I would bring up the present. Despite appearing on television in nearly equal proportion with men as high-powered lawyers, renowned medical examiners or high-ranking police officers (while wearing heels, perfect make-up and sexy clothes), women in fact have not achieved parity with men in terms of either occupation or equal pay.

Try a simple project in your class. Have students cut out paper dolls of boy and girl stick figures and ask them to choose one for each of the following occupations:  secretary, nurse, teacher, cashier, firefighter, doctor, engineer. If they choose the boy doll for any of the first four, congratulatio - you’ve got some serious counter-culturalists there.

In fact, the top four occupations for U.S. women in 2008 were: secretary (or administrative assistant), k-8 schoolteacher, registered nurse and cashier.

And even when women get jobs in male-dominated occupations, they still earn less.

I know. Elementary students learn from stories, and heroes matter as role models.  Then tell the story of Lilly Ledbetter, who found out she was underpaid only after years of working as an area manager in an automobile tire plant alongside 15 men who had the same job and earned up to 40 percent more. She sued, but lost when the Supreme Court ruled that she waited too long - even though she didn’t know about the injustice while it was happening.

There’s a semi-happy ending to the Lilly Ledbetter story. The first bill President Barack Obama signed into law, in January 2009, was the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, which allows women to sue even years after discrimination begins.

How should we teach Women’s History Month? With the truth: That we’ve made progress, but injustice still exists. Let’s teach students to hunger for justice, know how to recognize its absence and fight for it in the imperfect world they inherit.