You are now being logged in using your Facebook credentials
The Pawns of Politics: Where Is My Patronage?

The Pawns of Politics: Where Is My Patronage?

Peter Grear

Educate, organize and mobilize -- For more than a year leading up to the recently completed General Elections, I’ve written about Voter Suppression, gerrymandering, the Black vote and voters.  

Read More...
Thurgood Marshall College Fund Focuses on Developing Black CEOs

Thurgood Marshall College Fund Focuses on Developing Black CEOs

Developing Black CEOs

According to research conducted by Richard Zweigenhaft, a psychology professor at Guilford College in Greensboro, N.C., though Blacks account for more than 13 percent of the U.S. population, 

Read More...
Verbal Abuse in the Workplace: Are Men or Women Most at Risk?

Verbal Abuse in the Workplace: Are Men or Women Most at Risk?

Abuse in the Workplace

There is no significant difference in the prevalence of verbal abuse in the workplace between men and women, according to a systematic review of the literature conducted by researchers at the Institut universitaire de santé mentale de Montréal

Read More...
The Decision to Handle Rejection

The Decision to Handle Rejection

Rev. Manson B. Johnson

The Big Idea: Endurance is the key to achieving challenging goals in life.“Man’s rejection can be God’s direction.  God sometimes uses the rejection of hateful people to move us to a new place or assignment–where we wouldn’t have thought of going on our own.  

Read More...
How to Turn Personal Obstacles into Triumphs

How to Turn Personal Obstacles into Triumphs

(StatePoint) Everyone faces setbacks in life.

While those personal obstacles can lead to disappointing outcomes, they can also be harnessed into personal motivators, say experts. 

Read More...
Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Print Subscription

 Greater Diversity News (GDN) is a statewide publication with national reach and relevance.  We are a chosen news source for underrepresented and underserved communities in North Carolina.  

Read More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2011 JoomlaWorks Ltd.

Neighborhood Natives Move Out When Immigrants Move In

Written by Featured Organization on 10 February 2011.

Native residents of a neighborhood are more likely to move out when immigrants move in, according to new research by three American sociologists.

"Neighborhood Immigration and Native Out-Migration" appears in the February issue of the American Sociological Review. Study authors are Kyle Crowder of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Matthew Hall of the University of Illinois-Chicago and Stewart E. Tolnay of the University of Washington.

The authors note that for native whites the tendency to leave areas with large and growing immigrant populations appears to be rooted in reactions to the racial composition of a neighborhood. In contrast, decreasing homeownership rates and increasing costs of housing in the neighborhood appear to be the primary impetus for native blacks to leave neighborhoods with large and growing immigrant populations.

However, large concentrations of immigrants in areas surrounding a neighborhood reduce the likelihood that native black and white residents of that neighborhood will leave. The scholars propose that this may be because these surrounding areas, which normally would be the most likely destinations for native householders seeking to relocate, become less attractive to those native householders when they contain larger immigrant populations.

The authors used data from a longitudinal survey of U.S. residents called the Panel Study of Income Dynamics linked to information on neighborhoods drawn from four U.S. Censuses. The research sample included 16,516 native-born, non-Latino white and non-Latino black heads of households from 1968 to 2005.

"While the settlement patterns of immigrants themselves are important, native-born residents' decisions to remain in diversifying neighborhoods or to flee in the face of growing immigrant concentrations are just as crucial in determining the trajectory of residential integration," said Crowder, the Howard W. Odum Distinguished Professor of Sociology in UNC's College of Arts and Sciences and a fellow of the Carolina Population Center.

"These findings have important implications for processes of immigrant incorporation, patterns of neighborhood change and broader systems of residential segregation," he said.

Crowder researches social demography, racial and ethnic stratification, residential mobility and migration, residential segregation, neighborhood dynamics and urban politics and development.

Hall is an assistant professor in the department of sociology and the Institute of Government and Public Affairs at the University of Illinois-Chicago. His central research interests are in urban sociology, social demography, migration/immigration and labor markets.

Tolnay is S. Frank Miyamoto Professor of Sociology at the University of Washington. His recent research and publications have focused on the Great Migration of African-Americans.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend