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Voter Outreach

Voter Outreach

Concepts, strategies and objectives to move voters to action

Written by Peter Grear Educate, Organize and Mobilize: Each week over the past several months I’ve written about various aspects of voter suppression with the purpose of explaining its concepts,…

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Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles at Trask Coliseum. WILMINGTON, NC – Boldly proclaiming, “I’m a winner,” and promising “an exciting brand of basketball” newly-christened UNCW head men’s basketball coach Kevin Keatts said Tuesday that a new day in Seahawk basketball has arrived.

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Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7 in a temptation-resistance paradigm. Approximately half of the children were lied to by an experimenter, who said there was “a huge bowl of candy in the next room” but quickly confessed this was just a ruse to get the child to come play a game. 

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Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

The unconscious mind could catch a liar

“We set out to test whether the unconscious mind could catch a liar – even when the conscious mind failed,” says ten Brinke. Along with Berkeley-Haas Assistant Professor Dana R. Carney, lead author ten Brinke and Dayna Stimson (BS 2013, Psychology), hypothesized that these seemingly paradoxical findings may be accounted for by unconscious mental processes.

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Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

North Carolina Alliance of Black Elected Officials

Written by Peter Grear, Esq.  Since August 2013 I've continued to ask myself "what would an effective campaign to defeat voter suppression look like?” Well, on Friday, February 14, 2014, Valentine's Day, I got my answer from Richard Hooker, President of the…

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Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website

The FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website. No paper, no hasel, read on your laptop or mobile devices. 

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Strong Start: Symposium Offers Solutions to Education Decline

Written by Jihad Hassan Muhammad, The Dallas Examiner on 08 July 2011.

The quality of public education has been a heavy concern across the United States for many years.  With the current downturn of the economy and downsizing of the school system, there is a growing concern about the nation’s schools ability to adequately educate today’s youth. Students at predominantly African American schools are at greater risk; according to statistics that show a large percentage of Black students are already at a disadvantage, more so than their Caucasian counterparts, or any other group in America.

Marian Wright Edelman, president/founder of the Children’s Defense Fund suggests that a “toxic cocktail of poverty, illiteracy, racial disparities, violence, massive incarceration and family breakdown,” has led to a gap in education, health disparities and broken dreams.

Recently, the Educational Testing Service and the Children’s Defense Fund brought awareness to this issue as they co-sponsored a joint symposium, called: A Strong Start: Positioning Young Black Boys for Educational Success at The National Press Club, in Washington D.C.

ETS serves individuals, educational institutions, and government agencies by providing customized solutions for teacher certification, English language learning, and elementary, secondary and post-secondary education, as well as conducting education research, analysis, and policy studies.  CDF’s mission is to ensure every child a healthy start, a head start, a fair start, a safe start and a moral start in life and successful passage to adulthood with the help of caring families and communities.

“The higher rates of drop outs, the higher rates of incarceration, the higher rates of unemployment, and the need to find ways to reverse those negative trends caused us to do the symposium, focusing on the root of the problems and an effort to find a long term solution,” said Michael Nettles, ETS senior vice president.

A Strong Start also focused on the link between early brain development and later academic achievement.  The lack of this early brain development and academic achievement is referred to as the “cradle to prison pipeline.”  The symposium reported that more than 40 percent of Black children are born into poverty.  Poor Black children are behind in cognitive development at nine months and further behind at 24 months. It further reported that 3.5 million Black boys under the age of nine will not go to college or become prosperous adults.  The above facts ultimately lead to a statistic that experts say are relative to the lack of education and that is the overwhelming amount of incarceration in the Black community – which is 63 percent of all who are incarcerated, while Blacks are only approximately 13 percent of America’s population.

“Early education and early development sets the stage if a child will end up in prison, even in the womb when a woman is pregnant.  That emotion response, along with social development, is very important in regards to this,” said Catherine Beane, the director of policy at the CDF.

Beane also cited that the need to get involved and change the dismal outlook connected to the non-socialization and lack of education of our children is imperative.

“If a child is not successful in education the chances of them going to prison goes up dramatically.  We, as a community and as parents, must be actively involved in our children’s lives to stop that” she continued.

NAACP’s attorney Wade Henderson talked of the importance of early social and educational development.

“The family is the first school the children go to.  Reading to your child, having dinner with your child builds their understanding of words and learning, which affect these outcomes positively,” Henderson said.  He is also the ETS vice chair of the Board of Trustees and president of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights – one of the country’s premier civil and human rights coalitions.  Symposium speakers advised its audience that the condition of education in the Black community could be observed and acted upon from a holistic and socially active approach.  But, politics and public policy must reflect equality in the education of children in the Black community and poverty overall to be fully effective.

“Fighting to achieve an equal education for our children is not a light weight effort.  Resources must be cultivated for them.  There is a need to ensure we provided an adequate support on the federal and state level.  Regardless of where they live and what their zip codes is, our voices and vote must make a difference,” Henderson said.

Organizations like the CDF are taking steps to make a difference.  Its Freedom Schools – a national program that provides summer and after-school enrichment that focus on reading, self-esteem, and positive attitudes toward learning – are a lasting objective and outcome that have rendered results for educational development.

Edelman is actively grooming and cultivating young minds.  During the summer, she brings 1,300 young people to the Knoxville, Tennessee to the Alex Haley Farm to be trained in aspects of better education to work within the Freedom Schools.  Edelman also writes a weekly column, educating and updating readers on a variety of concerns regarding the education, health and wellbeing of America’s youth.

The ETS published an A Strong Start statistical profile that indicated other strategies needed to help combat the current statistics, such as better health care during pregnancy and for children, stability and security in the home, active neighborhood centers for youth, sex education, and birth control.

The groups concluded that the objectives and outcomes of the symposium where vast and attainable, like parents getting more involved from the womb and early childhood development, lifting their voice regarding concerns and voting for equality in education, and members of the community could volunteer and become mentors.  With consistent effort, change could become present in the education of our community.