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Honey Brown Hope Foundation Rakes in National, State and Local Recognition

Honey Brown Hope Foundation Rakes in National, State and Local Recognition

Honey Brown Hope Foundation

Houston, TX — The Honey Brown Hope Foundation, a nationally recognized, award-winning 501(c)3 non-profit that has served youth and their families for over two decades, announced today that it is thankful this holiday season for recently being recognized for its civil rights

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Community Empowerment: Black Chambers of Commerce Where Is My Patronage?

Community Empowerment: Black Chambers of Commerce Where Is My Patronage?

Peter Grear

Educate, organize and mobilize -- Back in September I wrote an article entitled, Voter Suppression: Creating Black Wealth.  The impetus for that article was a commentary written by Earl G. Graves, Sr., Publisher of Black Enterprise. 

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Employees of Small, Locally-Owned Businesses Have More Company Loyalty

Employees of Small, Locally-Owned Businesses Have More Company Loyalty

loyalty to employers

Employees who work at small, locally owned businesses have the highest level of loyalty to their employers — and for rural workers, size and ownership of their company figure even more into their commitment than job satisfaction does

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The Pawns of Politics: Where Is My Patronage?

The Pawns of Politics: Where Is My Patronage?

Peter Grear

Educate, organize and mobilize -- For more than a year leading up to the recently completed General Elections, I’ve written about Voter Suppression, gerrymandering, the Black vote and voters.  

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Verbal Abuse in the Workplace: Are Men or Women Most at Risk?

Verbal Abuse in the Workplace: Are Men or Women Most at Risk?

Abuse in the Workplace

There is no significant difference in the prevalence of verbal abuse in the workplace between men and women, according to a systematic review of the literature conducted by researchers at the Institut universitaire de santé mentale de Montréal

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The Decision to Handle Rejection

The Decision to Handle Rejection

Rev. Manson B. Johnson

The Big Idea: Endurance is the key to achieving challenging goals in life.“Man’s rejection can be God’s direction.  God sometimes uses the rejection of hateful people to move us to a new place or assignment–where we wouldn’t have thought of going on our own.  

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Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Subscribe to Get GDN Print Edition

Print Subscription

 Greater Diversity News (GDN) is a statewide publication with national reach and relevance.  We are a chosen news source for underrepresented and underserved communities in North Carolina.  

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New Program to Help Close 'Digital Divide' in Atlanta

Written by Featured Organization on 26 August 2011.

ATLANTA – More than 300,000 low-income students will be able to access broadband in their homes through a new program designed to bridge the digital divide between people with access to technology and people without it, officials announced.

Gov. Nathan Deal, Mayor Kasim Reed and Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) applauded the launch of Internet Essentials, part of a 28-county partnership between Comcast and area school districts that aim to provide low-cost internet service, affordable computers and online literacy training.

The program, which has several qualification guidelines, is considered a key step in providing information technology to low-income minority communities and other critically underserved populations.

"The internet is no longer a dispensable item.  It's essential in almost every aspect of our lives from our education to our careers," Deal told a throng of reporters at Charles R. Drew Charter School in Atlanta's East Lake neighborhood, one of the targeted communities.

Atlanta Public Schools Chair Brenda Muhammad agreed, adding: "We're excited that children who need it most will get this opportunity."
Under the program, Internet Essentials participants will receive:

• Home internet service for $9.95 a month, plus tax
• No price increases, no activation fees, or equipment rental fees
• A voucher to buy a low-cost computer for $149.99 plus tax
• Access to free digital literacy training in print, online and in-person.

Eligible households must have a child who receives lunch under the National School Lunch Program, officials said, among other guidelines.

Comcast executive David Cohen said the Internet Essentials program has the potential to be a "great equalizer and a life-changing technology."

"Internet Essentials will help level the playing field for low-income families by connecting students online with their teachers and their school's educational resources," Cohen said.
The program also will empower parents to receive digital literacy training so they can apply for jobs online or use the internet to research items of interest, he added.

Empowering people to access information online also can yield a positive economic impact for state and local governments, added House Minority Leader Stacey Abrams.

"When you give communities accessibility," she said, "you decrease their dependency on the government."

For years, the so-called "digital divide" between advantaged and disadvantaged communities has been a key issue for civil rights activists concerned that limited access to the internet meant limited access to information and power.

That's why closing that gap is so important, Reed said.

"While America has increasingly become a digital nation, many metro Atlanta families are at a disadvantage because they can't afford internet service at home," Reed said.  "Comcast is leading the charge in making broadband adoption a reality for more families."

While the city is proud to pledge its support, Reed said, "we can't do this alone. We need parents, educators, community leaders and other government officials to join in this effort, spread the word and help increase broadband adoption in our community."

 

Leaders met this week to announce a new campaign designed to provide low-income residents with low-cost internet service, affordable computers and online literacy training. The program is intended to bridge the digital divide between people with access to technology and people without it. In bottom right photo, a Comcast executive greets a student at Charles R. Drew Charter School in Atlanta.