You are now being logged in using your Facebook credentials
Voter Outreach

Voter Outreach

Concepts, strategies and objectives to move voters to action

Written by Peter Grear Educate, Organize and Mobilize: Each week over the past several months I’ve written about various aspects of voter suppression with the purpose of explaining its concepts,…

Read More...
Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

Keatts A Keeper For New-Look Seahawks

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles

New Head Men’s Basketball Coach was all smiles at Trask Coliseum. WILMINGTON, NC – Boldly proclaiming, “I’m a winner,” and promising “an exciting brand of basketball” newly-christened UNCW head men’s basketball coach Kevin Keatts said Tuesday that a new day in Seahawk basketball has arrived.

Read More...
Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

Lied-to Children More Likely to Cheat and Lie

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7

The study tested 186 children ages 3 to 7 in a temptation-resistance paradigm. Approximately half of the children were lied to by an experimenter, who said there was “a huge bowl of candy in the next room” but quickly confessed this was just a ruse to get the child to come play a game. 

Read More...
Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar When Conscious Mind Fails

The unconscious mind could catch a liar

“We set out to test whether the unconscious mind could catch a liar – even when the conscious mind failed,” says ten Brinke. Along with Berkeley-Haas Assistant Professor Dana R. Carney, lead author ten Brinke and Dayna Stimson (BS 2013, Psychology), hypothesized that these seemingly paradoxical findings may be accounted for by unconscious mental processes.

Read More...
Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials: Educate, Organize, and Mobilize

North Carolina Alliance of Black Elected Officials

Written by Peter Grear, Esq.  Since August 2013 I've continued to ask myself "what would an effective campaign to defeat voter suppression look like?” Well, on Friday, February 14, 2014, Valentine's Day, I got my answer from Richard Hooker, President of the…

Read More...
Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

Download Greater Diversity News Digital PDF Edition for FREE

FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website

The FREE Full PDF Edition includes stories not featured on the website. No paper, no hasel, read on your laptop or mobile devices. 

Read More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2011 JoomlaWorks Ltd.

Sports Marketing Expert: Lasting Damage to Woods as Endorser

Written by Featured Organization on 18 December 2009.

The Tiger Woods scandal may have a lasting impact on his endorsement potential, says University of Maryland professor Stephen McDaniel, a consumer psychologist who studies sports marketing and fan behavior. http://www.sph.umd.edu/KNES/faculty/smcdaniel/ “A brand such as Nike has historically been less interested in an athlete endorser’s virtue and more interested in their athletic prowess,” McDaniel says.

“However, this will probably not be the case for some of the other companies Wood’s endorses.

“Woods’ endorsements account for a large part of his earnings,” McDaniel says. “His squeaky clean image was an important part of his appeal as an endorser. However, since his recent auto accident and the subsequent revelations, it is difficult to imagine he can ever regain that stature.”
Since Woods’ accident, none of his commercials have aired, McDaniel points out. Industry research shows he has fallen from 6th most popular endorser to 24th, and this could continue to decline. Likewise, a recent “Washington Post” poll showed that over 40 percent of respondents held a negative opinion of him.

“Given the setbacks to his image and his recent decision to take a break from golf, Woods might not be much of an asset to his current sponsors,” McDaniel concludes. “These companies have invested millions in creating ads, many of which feature him golfing. In cases like this, companies often just quit running such ads and let an endorsement contract expire, rather than risk damaging their brand image by associating it with a controversial figure.

“Companies strategically choose celebrity endorsers based on a fit between their image and that of the endorser. By using the endorser in ads, it is a type of paired-associative learning, whereby they hope that consumers will transfer feelings toward the celebrity to the brand. When there’s scandal, companies do not want to risk a transfer of negative feelings.”

MISHANDLING THE PR

“Woods made the classic PR mistake of failing to address the issue early and directly,” McDaniel says. “Instead of speaking through his lawyer or posting statements to his website, he should have arranged for an interview where he could admit his ‘mistakes,’ apologize for hurting his family and letting down his fans, the sport of golf and his sponsors. His failure to do so invited further disclosures and continuing media scrutiny.”

McDaniel points to the example of Kobe Bryant, who apologized for his marital infidelity and got on with his successful NBA career, though Bryant never regained his prior level of endorsements.