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NAACP Applauds Attorney General Holder for Speaking Out Against Felony Disenfranchisement

Written by Featured Organization on Tuesday, 25 February 2014 12:42.

JOHN TRAVIS HOLT - NAACP

(Washington, DC)-- The NAACP commends Attorney General of the United States Eric Holder for speaking out against laws prohibiting people with felony convictions from voting even after they have served the terms of their sentences. The NAACP has been actively engaged in campaigns in Florida, Iowa, Virginia, Delaware and other states to bring the practice to an end. "By perpetuating the stigma and isolation imposed on formerly incarcerated individuals, these laws increase the likelihood they will commit future crimes," Holder said at a Washington, DC, symposium on sentencing laws. Florida, Iowa, and Kentucky are the only states that continue to disenfranchise persons convicted of felonies even after they have completed all of the terms of their sentences. There are an estimated 1.5 million disenfranchised citizens in Florida alone.

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Civil Rights Group Responds to Lesser Convictions and Hung Jury in Michael Dunn Trial for Murder of Unarmed Florida Teen

Written by Featured Organization on Monday, 24 February 2014 22:25.

JOHN TRAVIS HOLT GEORGIA FULTON NEW YORK – The following is a statement from Rashad Robinson, Executive Director of ColorOfChange.org, on the hung jury in the Dunn Trial: “On Saturday, February 15th, in Florida, the trial of Michael Dunn for shooting and killing unarmed 17-year old Jordan Davis resulted in a hung jury on the count of first-degree murder. Although we are pleased with the guilty verdictson the lesser charges of attempted murder and shooting a deadly missile, a mistrial on the most significant count of first-degree murder is outrageous.
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Wilmington on Fire (Kickstarter Pitch Video)

Written by John Travis Holt on Friday, 21 February 2014 18:09.

John Travis holt

"Wilmington on Fire" is a feature-length documentary that will give a historical and present day look at the Wilmington Massacre of 1898 and how the descendants of the victims of the event are asking for legal action in regards to compensation. The Wilmington Massacre of 1898 was a bloody attack on the African-American community by a heavily armed white mob on November 10, 1898 in the port city of Wilmington, North Carolina. It is also considered one of the only examples of a violent overthrow of an existing government (coup d'etat) and left countless numbers of African-American citizens dead. This event was the spring board for the white supremacy movement and Jim Crow (segregation) throughout the state of North Carolina, and the American South. © 2011 Christopher Everett

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EVENTS: New Hanover County Schools celebrates African American History Month

Written by Featured Organization on Monday, 10 February 2014 18:35.

February is African American History Month, and New Hanover County Schools (NHCS) has already begun to celebrate with events that are educational, inspirational and fun. Throughout the district, schools are incorporating African American studies into classroom curricula highlighting the important ways African Americans have impacted our nation's history. To celebrate African American History Month, the following events are planned:

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The Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials Elects New Officers

Written by Featured Organization on Monday, 10 February 2014 18:31.

Raleigh, NC—The Alliance of North Carolina Black Elected Officials held elections for its executive committee on December 3, 2013.  Swearing-in of the newly elected officers was scheduled 9 a.m. February 1, 2014 at the League of Municipalities Albert Coates Local Government Center 215 N. Dawson Street in downtown Raleigh. The ceremony was performed by Supreme Court Justice Cheri Beasley. 

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Upward Mobility Not Based on Merit

Written by By Jazelle Hunt, Washington Correspondent on Monday, 10 February 2014 18:27.

WASHINGTON (NNPA) – In last week’s State of the Union Address, President Barack Obama declared, “…Our success should depend not on accident of birth, but the strength of our work ethic and the scope of our dreams.” The operative word was “should.” A recent study by a team of Harvard University and University of California-Berkeley researchers and others confirm that the birth lottery still rules the day. The report states, “Contrary to popular perception, economic mobility has not changed significantly over time; however, it is consistently lower in the U.S. than in most developed countries. It also said two studies found, “Upward income mobility varies substantially within the U.S. Areas with greater mobility tend to have five characteristics: less segregation, less income inequality, better schools, greater social capital, and more stable families.”

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Consumer Advocates Claim Victory After 2-Year Campaign for Reform

Written by Charlene Crowell on Monday, 03 February 2014 15:47.

More good news keeps coming for consumers in early 2014. On the heels of new mortgage rules that took effect on January 10, the following week four banks making payday loans pulled their products from the market. Announcing a halt to their triple-digit interest rates were Wells Fargo, Regions, Fifth Third and US Bank. Together, these lenders have combined assets of $2.1 trillion, serving customers through 30,000 branches and more than 21,500 ATMs across the country.  

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Citizen Koch in North Carolina

Written by Andy Myers on Friday, 31 January 2014 13:12.

John Travis HoltWhat do North Carolina and Wisconsin have in common? On the surface of it, perhaps not much: one has subzero winter temperatures and the other sweltering summers with off the charts humidity. But more and more people are seeing parallels between the tar heel and badger states, particularly the power of unregulated big money in politics. As more and more North Carolinians come to the state capitol every week protesting cuts to unemployment insurance, tax cuts for the state’s wealthiest citizens, loosening of environmental regulations, and threats to voting rights,

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White House to Expand Education Opportunity

Written by Jazelle Hunt on Monday, 27 January 2014 17:05.

WASHINGTON (NNPA) – Thirty years ago, one year of tuition, room, and board at a nation’s four-year, degree-granting institution cost $8,756 on average (or $3,499, when adjusted for inflation).  As of 2010, that figure had almost tripled to $22,092 – and that’s just for one year.  To meet this economic hurdle, 39.6 million Americans have turned to the student loan market, taking on more than $1 trillion in debt of last year, according to the Department of Education’s Federal Student Aid office. Higher education, once a pipeline to the American Dream, is quickly becoming just a pipedream for low-income and underserved Americans. 

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Documentary: Old People Driving chronicles the adventures of 96-year-old Milton and 99-year-old Herbert

Written by Featured Organization on Monday, 27 January 2014 15:57.

Old People Driving chronicles the adventures of 96-year-old Milton and 99-year-old Herbert as they confront the end of their driving years. The film follows Herbert as he takes his last drive, hands over his keys and comes to terms with the reality of life without a car. Milton, meanwhile, continues to drive every day and vows to do so until he feels he’s no longer safe on the road. Through their stories, and a review of the latest traffic safety research, the film dispels some of the myths about elderly drivers without shying away from the fact that many will outlive their ability to drive safely. Old People Driving has screened at film festivals around the country and has received awards including Best Short Documentary at the Phoenix Film Festival and theMargaret and William Hearst Award for Excellence in Documentary Film. It was broadcast on PBS as part of the NewsHour/Economist Film Project and is distributed to the educational market by New Day Films.